5 beauty secrets from around the world - MissLJBeauty

5 beauty secrets from around the world



Over time, different cultures developed their own beauty tricks which remained, for the most part, their little secret... until the likes of beauty vlogs and Instagram came along. Now, we probably know more than we ever did about how women across the world make themselves look stunning.
Here are examples of particularly eye-opening beauty tips that I've picked up as a result of poring through Instagram and so forth. You don't have to set foot in a foreign land to benefit from them!
Skincare in Korea
If you have been to Korea, you might have heard of the word "Gwang", which refers to the fresh, dewy glow that Korean women often seem to have. Why are they so radiant? One big reason why is that "Korean women often double or triple cleanse," reveals make-up artist Carly Hobbs.
In words additionally quoted by the Healthy magazine website, Hobbs says that these ladies might, after exfoliating, apply foaming or cream cleanser and then use micellar water to remove grime.
Coconut oil in Tanzania
In the area of Zanzibar in the eastern African country of Tanzania, there's a melting pot of African, Muslim and Arabic cultures which has given rise to the use of coconut oil as a beauty staple.
Ever wondered why so many Zanzibar residents seem to have beautiful skin? You could plausibly attribute it to Muslim women's ability - as learned from birth - to make coconut oil from scratch. Coconut oil has made it into many products elsewhere, such as hand lotion from Tropic Skincare.
Seaweed and seawater in France
If your overseas holidays often include dips in the sea just off those glorious sandy beaches, this could be doing your skin a lot of good. French ladies appear to have learned this a long time ago, having made seawater integral to their beauty routine.
French women also habitually increase their circulation through using seaweed scrubs, says the Prevention website. Hey, Gallic tastes are far from just wine and baguettes...
Kakadu plum in Australia
Arnhem Land - the most north-eastern tip of Australia's Northern Territory - is home to the native flowering plant of the kakadu plum. Over thousands of years, indigenous Australians have deemed it to have medicinal properties - and not too surprisingly given its high amount of vitamin C.
In fact, its concentration of vitamin C is 50 times that of oranges, says mindbodygreen.com - and kakadu plum has been proven to make skin brighter and fresher.
Turmeric in India
Turmeric, a golden yellow spice, is a common ingredient of much Indian cuisine. However, you might not have realised how effectively it can improve the vibrancy of skin, too.
This spice is, for example, used in the haldi ceremony which traditionally precedes an Indian wedding. In the haldi ceremony, a turmeric paste is applied to the bride's face and body to make the skin less discernibly puffy.

Turmeric has antibacterial properties conducive to banishing blemishes. You could reap benefits of the spice by putting on a homemade turmeric mask.